How to set up Automatic Tank Fill

Automatically fill your water tank from the bore.

Automatic Tank Fill

Automatically fill the water tank directly from the bore.  The bore pump starts when the water level drops in the tank and the pump stops when the tank is full.

Basically, it monitors the water level in the tank so that the pump automatically starts when the water level is low and the pump automatically stops when the tank is full.

A – A float switch in the tank can monitor the water level. If using a 3 Phase bore pump, one or two float switches can be wired into the ‘CP3 Control Panel’.  The CP3 Control Panel is for 3 Phase bore pumps from 0.37kw to 7.5kw motors with DOL starters.  The CP3 option needed to perform this function is ‘Option BLC’ which is the relay to suit 1 or 2 float switches.  You will also need to purchase the ‘float switch’.  The float switches are available in different lengths from 1m to 50m. For this set up you will need the following:
  • CP3 Control Panel. These are available in different sizes depending on the kw of the submersible motor.  They range from 0.37kw up to 7.5kw.
    Link to CP3 Control Panel
  • Option BLC. This option is for the relay which goes into the CP3 Control Panel.
    Link to Option BLC
  • Float switch. The purpose of a float switch is to open or close a circuit as the level of water in the tank rises or falls.
    Link to Float Switches

Alternatively, you can use the ‘Level Control Panel’ with the ‘LLR option’. The Level Control Panel has the added feature of ‘Overload Indication’ and ‘Low Bore Indication with Reset Button Indication’. The Level Control Panel can also be used for 1 Phase bore pumps as well as 3 Phase. For the ‘Level Control Panel’ setup you will need the following:

  • Level Control Panel. These are available in different sizes depending on the kw of the submersible motor.  They range from 0.37kw to 3.7kw for a single 1 Phase 2-wire motor, from 0.75 to 3.7kw for a 3-wire single 1 Phase motor and from 0.75 to 7.5kw for a three 3 Phase motor.
    Link to the Level Control Panel
  • LLR Option. This option is fitted into the Level Control Panel and is for the ‘Start on level fall, Stop on level rise for tank filling.’
    Link to the LLR Option
  • Float Switch. The purpose of a float switch is to open or close a circuit as the level of water in the tank rises or falls.
    Link to Float Switches
B – ‘Water Level Probes’ can be installed in the tank to monitor the water level.If using a 3 Phase bore pump, the probes can be wired into the CP3 Control Panel.  The CP3 Control Panel is for 3 Phase bore pumps from 0.37kw to 7.5kw motors with DOL starters.  The CP3 option needed to perform this function is Option BLC which is the Probe relay to suit 1 or 2 probes.  You will also need to purchase the probes.  The probes are available in different lengths from 20m to 200m. For this set up you will need the following:
  • CP3 Control Panel. These are available in different sizes depending on the kw of the submersible motor.  They range from 0.37kw up to 7.5kw. Link to CP3 Control Panel
  • Option BLC. This option is for the probe relay which goes into the CP3 Control Panel.
    Link to Option BLC
  • Water Level Probes detect the level of water in the tank or bore.
    Link to Probes

Alternatively, you can use the ‘Level Control Panel’ with the ‘LLR option’. The Level Control Panel has the added feature of overload indication and low bore indication with reset button indication. The Level Control Panel can also be used for 1 Phase bore pumps as well as 3 Phase. For the ‘Level Control Panel ‘setup you will need the following:

  • Level Control Panel. These are available in different sizes depending on the kw of the submersible motor.  They range from 0.37kw to 3.7kw for a single 1 Phase 2-wire motor, from 0.75 to 3.7kw for a 3-wire single 1 Phase motor and from 0.75 to 7.5kw for a three 3 Phase motor.
    Link to the Level Control Panel
  • LLR Option. This option is fitted into the Level Control Panel and is for the “Start on level fall, Stop on level rise for tank filling.”
    Link to the LLR Option
  • Water Level Probes detect the level of water in the tank or bore.
    Link to Level Probes
C – A Double Ball Float in the water tank For this system to operate efficiently, you would need a pressure switch (such as the Telemecanique pressure switch) and a pressure tank.  The pressure switch is wired into the pumps starter/control box circuitry.The double ball float in the tank works on pressure.  When the tank empties, the float releases the pressure in the line which indicates to the pressure switch to turn the pump on.   For the ‘Double Ball Float’ setup you will need the following:
  • Telemecanique Pressure Switches are for controlling water pressure booster sets in conjunction with an expansion vessel. They have adjustable cut out and differential (cut in) pressure to suit your application. Link to Telemecanique Pressure Switch
  • The pressure tank absorbs water pressure by utilizing pre-charge compressed air / bladder arrangement. Because of this stored pressure (energy), when a valve or tap is opened water is pushed out of the tank through the plumbing system. When the water in the pressures tank drops below the pre-charged value, the pressure switch is activated turning on the pump. The pump then refills the pressure tank. The combination of the pressure tank, pressure switch and the pump is what allows water to flow through your home or garden. Link to Pressure Tanks

How to Calculate Total Head

Work out the Total Dynamic Head for easy pump selection

Pump Head Calculation

There are TWO STEPS for the selection of submersible bore hole pumps:

Step 1 – Calculate the system head requirement

Step 2 – Select a Pump

Step 1 – To ‘Calculate the System Head Requirement’, you will need to know 3 things:

  1. Static Head
  2. Pipe Friction Loss
  3. Discharge Pressure

The total of the above 3 things will give you your ‘Total System Head Requirement’ in meters.

You will use this figure along with the ‘Litres Per Minute’ (LPM) that you require for your system.

Take this information and look at the bore pump flow charts (also known as curves) to select a suitable bore pump.

Note* the LPM that you require must be less than your bore produces so that you don’t run out of water in the bore.  If you are not sure of the flow of the bore then it is safer to also purchase a bore pump controller with a ‘level control option’. The Level Controller will monitor the water level in the bore and shut it down before it runs dry.  This will also prolong the life of your pump.

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Use a Constant Pressure System to supply water to the house & garden directly from your bore. If you are worried about slight miscalculations in your total head, these systems can also run outside the recommended head for short periods.

How to Calculate the Total System Head

1 – First you need as much information on the bore and installation as possible. See ‘bore details’ at the bottom of the page.

2 – Basically the Total System Head is a combination of:

  1. the “Static Head” which is a measurement from the Static Water Level (or standing/draw down water level) to the highest point of the discharge outlet pipework.
  2. plus the Rising Main and Delivery Pipework “Frictional Loss”.
  3. plus the “Discharge Pressure Required” at the discharge outlet pipework.

Example:

Static Head = from standing/static/drawdown water level to the discharge pipework outlet at its highest point. Let’s say as an example it is 45 metres (450kpa)

Frictional Loss = losses in metres or kpa based on the ID Size and Type of Pipework by the required pumping flow rate in Litres/Second. Generally most pipe friction handbooks offer the friction loss per/100 metres. Let’s say the pipe is 32mm Polyethylene PN6.3 (PE63), PN8 (PE80) and P10 (PE100) has an  internal pipe ID of 28.1mm, therefore at a Flow rate of 0.5 Litres/second (1.8m3/hr) the fictional loss will be 3.07 metres frictional loss per/100 metres length of pipework. If you have 1 km of discharge pipework the overall friction loss will be 3.07 x 10 = 30.7 metres loss.

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If you are not totally confident that you have calculated the ‘Total Head’ correctly, then it is advisable to purchase some type of motor protection device that will shut the pump down if it runs dry, cavitates, overheats or runs outside the recommended head. This will prolong the life of your pump.


Outside
Diameter
(mm)
Pressure Rating
PN 2.5 PN 4 PN 6 PN 10 PN 16
Inside Diameter (mm)
20 16 14.4
25 21 20.4 18
32 28 26.2 23.2
40 36 35.4 32.6 29
50 46 44.2 40.8 36.2
63 59.8 58.2 55.8 51.4 45.8
75 71.2 69.3 66.4 61.4 54.4
90 85.6 83 79.8 73.6 65.4
110 104.6 101.6 97.4 90 79.8
125 118.8 115.4 110.8 102.2 90.8


Chart for measuring the internal diameter of poly pipe

Then you need to calculate the Bore Riser Pipe friction losses, from the discharge of the pump to the bore head works, which in this example we will say 5 metres.

Use a Pipe Friction Loss Calculator

Discharge Pressure Required = If you are operating reticulation sprinklers you generally require around 200 to 250kpa pressure or 20 to 25 metres.
(You will need to confirm required system operating pressure).

PSI ÷ 1.42 = Meter Head eg: 35PSI ÷ 1.42 = 24.64m
Kpa ÷ 10 = Meter Head eg: 200kpa ÷ 10 = 20m

Therefore the Total Head will be:

  1. Static Head = 45 metres
  2. Friction Loss = 30.7 metres + 5 metres
  3. Discharge Pressure = 20.0 to 25.0 metres = 100.7 metres to 105.7 metres.

Total System Head Requirements = 100.7 to 106.4



In this example the System Operating Pressure required is 200kpa.
Duty will therefore be 1.8m3/hr @ 100.7 metres.
(example only… In reality you would not utilise pipework that introduces such high frictional losses.)

Note * There are other factors that need to be considered when calculating Total Head, such as Water Temperature, SG of Water, number of 45° & 90° Elbows installed, Isolation Valves, Check Valves, System Pipework such as long reticulation pipe runs. These losses also need to be factored into the calculation.

Remember, if you cannot answer the questions then it is impossible for you to calculate the system head requirement and therefore select a pump.

I trust the information provided meets with your immediate needs. Should you require further detail please do not hesitate to contact me.

IMPORTANT: If you are planning to use the pump to:

(1) Fill a tank (open discharge) AND

(2) Supply water for an irrigation system or taps, please let me know as there may be a huge difference between these 2 situations in Total head. It can be difficult choosing a pump that will run efficiently in both situations on the efficiency curve. I am not saying that it can’t be done… the pump selection just needs to be spot on!

BORE DETAILS

(a) Bore Depth (M)

(b) Pump Set Depth (M)

(c) Standing Water Level (M)

(d) Draw Down Level (M) (not many people have this info as it requires an expensive test, so we use Pumping Water Level)

(d) Pumping water level (M)

(e) Depth to Slots in bore casing (M)

(f) Bore casing size (diameter) (mm or inch)

(g) Elevation or height from the top of the bore to the highest point of discharge (tank, taps, house etc) (M)

(h) Flow of bore in LPM

PIPING

(i) Length of Pipe from bore pump to ground Level (M)

(j) Diameter of Pipe from bore pump to the top of the bore (mm)

(k) Distance from Bore to furthest tap (M)

Or…

(k) Distance from bore to tank (if only filling tank) (M)

(l) Diameter of pipe from bore to furthest tap or tank

How many elbows in pipework

How many check / non-return valves in pipework

DISCHARGE PRESSURE

(m) Max Service Pressure Required (Psi) (if you are running sprinklers, what psi do they require)?

(h) Flow of Water the bore produces (LPM)


How to Install a Bore Pump

Everyone has there own way of installing a bore pump. Here we show you our guide to installation.

Installing a Submersible Bore / Well Pump

Please feel free to use the info on this website as a guide only. There are different methods of installing a bore pump.

Please check the following points to ensure correct pump operation.

  • Pump should not be installed in water over 40 degrees centigrade.
  • Direction of rotation of pump must be checked prior to installing in the bore. On three phase pumps, check for direction of rotation before installing pump in the bore. Pump should run anti-clockwise when looking down on pump. Should direction be wrong change any 2 leads at termination box. Motor should be protected with the recommended thermal overloads.
  • Correct cable size must be used. (check with electrician).
  • Do not use pump to pump sand or gravel. The bore must be developed or rehabilitated and be producing clean water prior to installation.
  • If the pump is being used as a pressure system, use the recommended pressure tanks or pressure switch and do not allow pump to short cycle.
  • Do not run pump dry.
  • Pump is not suitable for use in some types of corrosive water. (If unsure have water tested and seek advice).
  • If the pump is throttled back Fig 8. to less than 0.5lps, then an Auto Control Box with water level monitoring probes must be used instead of the standard switch.
  • Pump should be installed using suitable support cable.
  • Starting voltage at the pump and frequency must be correct.
  • Bore suitability check the following.
    • Water quality.
    • Is the bore straight.
    • Is the bore correctly cased.
    • Has the bore got a sand screen.
    • Does the bore have sufficient capacity to suit the pump.
  • Check the burst pressure of the pipe to make sure that it is compatible with the pump pressure.  Refer to section below on Polythylene Pipe Class

INSTALLING PUMP IN BORE

There are many different ways to install a Submersible Bore / Well Pump. Here is one method of Pump Installation:

  • Splice the cable from the bore pump to the submersible cable refer to section below on Cable Splice
  • Feed the other end of the submersible cable through the hole in the bore cap and fix. Fig 1. Appropriate electrical fitting may need to be purchased if it is not part of the bore cap. Fig 2.
  • Wire the submersible cable to the appropriate Control Device as seen in Fig 1.
  • Lay the pump with cable along the ground from the top of the bore, so that the pump is at the bore end.
  • Lay the pipe and block the ends of the pipe so that no stones, dirt or gravel can enter the ends of the pipe and lay the pipe along the ground along-side the submersible electrical cable and pump. It is very important that you don’t kink or bend the poly (if using poly pipe) as this can result in the poly splitting later.
  • Install the shroud Fig 3. (if needed) refer to section below on Bore Pump Shroud.
  • Connect the bore pump to the pipe and bore cap using appropriately rated pipe fittings.
  • Make sure there is a non-return valve included on the line.
  • Lay the water level monitoring probes (if needed) next to the pipe.
  • Tape the probes to the pipe every 3 meters to prevent snarling of cable. Use a strong tape such as duct tape.
  • Attach the stainless steel support cable Fig 5. refer to section below on Stainless Steel Support Cable
  • You should now see bundled together and laid out on the ground, the pipe and probes taped together. Not taped, but laying along side them is the electrical cable and the safety cable.
  • MAKE SURE THE SAFETY SUPPORT CABLE IS CONNECTED TO THE BORE CAP AND SECURED.
  • The bundle of pump, pipe, cable, probes and safely cable can now be carefully lowered into the bore taking care not to cut or chafe the cable insulation on the bore casing.
  • Lower the pump into the bore slowly without force to the required depth. Your bore report will usually have a recommended ‘pump set depth’.  Make sure the poly doesn’t kink at all when lowering it into the bore as it may possibly cause the poly to split later when under pressure.
  • DO NOT SET THE PUMP AT THE BOTTOM OF THE BORE.
  • MAKE SURE THE PUMP IS POSITIONED ABOVE THE CASING SLOTS or at the recommended pump set depth on the bore report.
  • Pull on the bore pump support cable so the weight of the pump is on the cable and then fix it.

I will supply more images of a pump being installed down a bore / well soon

PUMP START UP Partially throttle pump Fig 8. and run until the water is clear of sand or any impurities. Gradually open the throttle valve until the pressure gauge Fig 9. is at the required operating pressure. If the pressure gauge continues to drop once valve is set the water level is dropping in the bore. Close the valve further until a steady operating pressure is shown on the gauge. If the capacity of the bore is unreliable a flow switch with timer or bore probes should be used to protect the pump from running dry.

BORE PUMP SHROUD If the pump is being installed below the water inlet level, then a pump shroud should be used.  A shroud should also be used in:

  • Cascading bores
  • Low yielding bores
  • Top feeding bores
  • If the bore casing is greater than 5”diameter
  • If the pump is throttled back more than 25% of it’s rated flow
  • If the position of the slots in the casing is unknown
  • If the pump is being installed in a dam or river
  • If the pump is to be set below the production level of the bore

Pump shrouds are installed over the body of the pump and motor. The shroud  protects the pump from damage from falling sand and ensures that the water flow past the motor is sufficient to achieve adequate cooling of the motor.  Failure to install a shroud can result in motor shutdown and failure. A pump shroud can easily be made from PVC pipe. Buy a PVC Shroud Adapter

CABLE SPLICE After first checking cable size for suitability, proceed with the cable splice. This is a very important step and extreme care should be taken. On three phase pumps, check for direction of rotation before installing pump in the bore. Pump should run anti-clockwise when looking down on pump. Should direction be wrong change any 2 leads at termination box. Proper submersible heat shrinks need to be used to seal underwater joins and all systems need to be properly earthed. All wiring should conform to national and local codes and be done by a competent electrician.

STAINLESS STEEL SUPPORT CABLE Never allow the pump weight to be supported by the electric cable alone. Stainless steel safety cable must always be installed to support the pump.  A strong saddle is often used to connect the safely cable to the hole in the top of the bore pump. The support cable should be secured to the well / bore head fitting which in turn should be able to transfer the weight to the concrete surface pad around the top of the bore casing. Stainless steel support cable is required to provide insurance for those unfortunate times when the metric poly pipe breaks or loosens in the fittings. It is used for lifting the pump in and out of the bore and to support the pump in the bore so there is no pump weight on the electrical cable or the rising main.

POLYTHYLENE PIPE CLASS Water delivery pipe, needs to be of sufficient pressure rating and diameter to sustain pressure loads and still deliver adequate flow rates without being restricted by friction loss. All pipe fittings need to be of the same or better pressure rating as the rising main. Pumps installed down to 120 metres are commonly done so on 40 or 50 mm. Class 12 polythene pipe. Installations to 150 metres should use class 15 polythene up to 2.2 Kw motor size. For depths greater than 150 metres or motor sizes larger than 2.2 Kw use steel or galvanised pipe to install the pump. It is very important to check the pressure rating of the pipe and make sure it is compatible with the pump pressure. If you take the pump details along with the depth that you are installing the pump at, to your irrigation store, they will let you know exactly what size pipe to get.

There are many variations to the following method of bore pump installation. I have included these instructions as a general guideline. If you have your own method and have photos which you would like me to include on this site, please contact me

All the accessories needed to install a bore pump are listed on my BORE PUMP ACCESSORIES page

The are many different ways of installing a submersible bore pump. Here is an example only of a submersible pump installation.

CLICK HERE to view a video on installing a submersible bore pump:

Fig 1

Bore pump is spliced to submersible electrical cable which is threaded through the appropriate hole in the bore cap and wired to the Starter Box (or control box).

Fig 2

There are many different types of bore caps available. Each one should have a slot for the submersible cable to be threaded through making sure it is secure.

Fig 3

PVC Shroud Adaptor

Fig 4

Submersible Electrical Cable or Electric Drop Cable. There is different ratings for insulated submersible cable so it is very important that you select the correct cable for your situation.

Fig 5

Stainless Steel safely wire or support cable is vital to support the bore pump in the well so that the weight is on the cable and not the pump.

Fig 6

A saddle or shackle can be used to secure the support cable to the Pump. Every bore pump should have a hole at the top of the pump for positioning of the support cable.

Fig 7

Special irrigation fittings need to be purchased to secure the mains pipe to the bore cap.

Fig 8

A tap installed at the top of the bore can be used to throttle back or adjust the flow of water from the bore.

When including a pressure tank on the line, use a manifold kit which ensures that all the items are correctly spaced If using a larger stand alone tank, then the braided connection will connect to the socket where the tank is and this is then connected to the tank

Fig 9

Gauge used for monitoring the water pressure from the bore.

Fig 10

There are many different ways to splice submersible cables. Heatshrink, Shrinkwrap or Waterproof tape along with connectors create a watertight splice

How to Select a Submersible Bore Pump

Selecting the correct bore pump is vital for the life of the pump.

Working Out Which Size Submersible Bore Pump Is Needed

There are 2 things we need for the selection of submersible bore hole pumps:

 1 – What is the Total System Head Required?

To Calculate the System Head Requirement, please visit our FAQ Page: Calculate Total Head

2 – Litres Per Minute (LPM) required

Work out how many litres per minute all your taps, sprinklers etc require. What is the maximum that you will be running at one time? Then add up the litres per minute to get a total. If you are unsure of how many LPM sprinklers and taps require, look on the sprinkler packaging or go to your local hardware shop and read the packaging as it will always be displayed. Eg: a large pop up sprinkler with a 24m diameter spray with a size 8 nozzle will require 12 LPM. If I used 8, then I would require 12 x 8 = 96 LPM

Selecting a suitable Bore Pump

You will need to go to the flow chart of the bore pump. Choose a flow chart that displays the models that will produce the amount of water you need. They are usually rated in LPM or m3/h.

LPM x 60 ÷ 1000 = m3/h

A flow chart will have the LPM or the m3/h across the bottom of the chart and the Head (m) running vertically on the left side of the chart.

The chart below (figure 3) is for pumps rated at 18LPM.

Look along the bottom of the flow chart where the LPM are displayed and move to the 18LPM mark.

Now run a line vertically straight up to the efficiency curve. You will notice that the peak of the curve is at 18LPM. I have marked the line in red for you to see.

For this example, we need a pump that will give us 20LPM @ 65m head.

We chose the flow chart for 18LPM as it is close to 20LPM that we require.

If we follow the line up to the efficiency curve you can see that it is still around the top of the curve (and slightly to the right) which is good.


IMPORTANT – In the image below you can see the ‘Best Efficiency Range’ at the top of the chart. There is also a ‘Pump Operating Range’. If the pump is operating too far to the right or left of this range you can under load or overload the motor. Either will shorten the life of the pump and motor.


The result of this example is that we would go with the 0.55kw – 13 model from this selection.

The Bore Pumps are displayed on this page ranging in Liters Per Minute (from the smallest flow to the largest flow). When you click on a selected pump, you can view the Flow Curves for that range. Eg, the above flow curve is for 18LPM bore pumps.

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The OEM Bore Pumps are the cheapest on the site. They come with the option of an Automatic Control Box which has water level monitoring probes that go down the bore with the pump to monitor the water level. If there is not enough water, the system will shut down until the water level in the bore recovers and will allow the system to restart when the water level in the bore recovers. Handy if you don’t know the flow of the bore or have a low yielding bore.

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The best value bore pump for sale is the Pentax Bore Pump coupled with a Franklin motor. This combination is massively reduced in price to be the best quality value bore pump for sale on the internet. Franklin Motor protection is also available with the Pentax range.

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The Wilo-Emu German made bore pumps are equivalent to the Grundfos range in quality, design and flow rates. They also have a very popular low-flow range that Grundfos don’t have. These are excellent value for money pumps.

Demand Feeding Direct from the Bore

Supply your house or garden directly from your bore.

Demand Feeding Direct from the Bore

There are many ways of pumping water directly from your bore to the house and/or garden. Here are a couple of methods that you can follow:

Method 1 – Using a Constant Pressure System (This is by far the most efficient and reliable method)

Method 2 – Using a Submersible Bore Pump with a Pressure Tank


Method 1 – This system continuously monitors your water demands and provides constant pressure throughout your home and garden reticulation system. Pump water directly and on demand from your bore / well to your house and or garden.

Turn on 1 tap or 6 taps, this system monitors and automatically adjusts the pump speed to adjust the flow accordingly and keeps the pressure constant.

All in one easy and quick package to get you pumping quickly!

  • SubDrive Pump
  • SubDrive Motor
  • SubDrive Controller
  • Pressure Gauge
  • Pressure Sensor
  • Splice Kit
  • Pressure Tank

Also Available:

  • 8L to 80L Pressure Tanks
  • Electrical Drop Cable
  • Bore Accessories

SubDrive QuickPAK is a popular system solution package, designed to make installing a constant pressure system even easier.

  • Motor, Pump and Drive in one package
  • Selection based on flow requirement
  • System-specific performance curve
  • Available in IP20 (NEMA 1) or IP56 (NEMA4) rated enclosures
  • 5-year warranty on QuickPAK components

Method 2

Using a submersible bore pump with a pressure tank

The 3-wire single phase motor is wired to a 3 wire controller/starter box. From the box it is wired to the pressure switch which is then connected to the mains power.

A 75 Litre pressure tank is recommended for an average size household. It will allow approx 25 litres of draw off before the pump activates.

As a basic guide you can use the following:

Up to 1hp motor (say 30-40LPM) Use a 60-75L tank

Up to 1.5hp motor (60LPM) I would use a minimum of 75L tank

2hp motor, use a 112L tank

3hp motor, use a 180L tank

4hp motor use any size bigger than 180L

A 20/40 pressure switch is recommended with a 75Litre Pressure Tank. Turns on at 20 PSI and turns off at 40 PSI. It can be adjusted to turn off at 68 PSI.

A 30/50 pressure switch turns on at 30 PSI and turns off at 50 PSI. It can be adjusted to turn off at 88 PSI

The differential pressure adjustments need to be correct. There must be adequate differential pressure adjustment to prevent the pump from cycling.

When using a bore pump with a pressure tank, you don’t want the pump to run frequently as it can burn out. To prevent this from happening, you can install a 1/4″ swing check valve to the pressure tank. Drill a 3/16th hole in the check valve. When the tank needs to empty itself, the check valve will open up fully, but when the tank is being filled, water is going into the tank through a 3/16th hole and that allows for a longer run time of the motor.

The water pipe comes from the bore to the house. It has a T-piece in the line which is connected to the pressure tank, which is connected to the pressure switch.

How to Choose the Right Size Pond Pump

Learn how to select the correct type and size of Pond Pump.

Choosing the Right Size Pond Pump

1.SAFETY FIRST! Water and power can be fatal!

All installations should be constructed, commissioned and maintained according to any relevant government laws, by-laws and regulations and according to the instruction manual provided with the product. Running garden pumps on extension leads is illegal. An earth leakage (RCD) device must be fitted. Any 240 volt electrical work must be carried out by a licensed electrician.

Recommended usage for lengths of power cable/cord on pumps:

3 pin plug – 2m or 3m cable – minimum length for outdoor use (patios, decks, courtyards)

3 pin plug – 10m cable – recommended length for outdoor installations; however no more than 2m should be left uncovered by conduit or similar, and cable must not be left tightly wound in a coil.

2 pin plug – 1.8m cable – indoor use only, aquariums and table fountains.

 

TIP ! Pumps don’t last forever. Always install to allow easy access and replacement !

2. CHOOSE THE RIGHT FLOW RATES

Make sure you get it right the first time or your customer will not be happy. Try to get them to tell you what they want – tell them to use a garden hose to do a mock-up and get a rough idea of what they are trying to achieve.

Suggested flow rates: Wall and table fountains……………………………200 to 300 L /Hr

Small statues to 400mm high…………………………………………………….400 to 500 L /Hr

Medium statues to 800mm high…………………………………………………600 to 750 L /Hr

Large and tiered statues to 1.5m high…………………………………………1000 to 1200 L /Hr

Statues over 1.5m and pond cascades…………………………………………1200 to 2000 L /Hr

Waterfalls and streams up to 0.4m wide……………………………………..3000 to 4000 L /Hr

Large waterfalls and streams up to 1.0m wide……………………………. 6000 to 12000 L /Hr

 

TIP ! Add 20% to required flow-rates to allow for friction loss in pipework.

3. DON’T FORGET THE HEAD HEIGHT!

Measure the head height from the water level to the highest outlet. Add together the flow rates required, add 20% for friction losses. If more than one function is being performed by the one pump, then choose a pump that can give the total flow at the highest height.

 

TIP ! Remember it is easier to throttle back an oversized pump, but there is nothing you can do with an under-sized pump !

4. POND SIZE – TURNOVER RATES

Suggested turnover rates:

Ponds up to 1000L……………………….once per hour

Ponds 1001-5000L……………………….once every 2 hours

Ponds 5001-15000L……………………..once every 3 hours

Ponds over 15000L……………………….once every 4 hours

 

TIP ! High fish stocks and koi ponds will require higher turnovers.

5. TUBING SIZE AND LENGTH

Too small tubing over a distance severely restricts the performance of the pump.

Long runs and high waterfalls may require larger diameters or multiple tubing. Please enquire if in doubt.

Suggested tubing sizes:

Flow in L/Hr…..Tubing Diameter

300-600……………..12mm

601-1200…………….16mm

1201-2000………….20mm

5001-8000………….32mm

8001-15000………..40mm

15001-20000………50mm

2001-5000…………..25mm

over 20000…………..Please enquire

 

6. COST TO RUN PUMPS – The Cheapest pump is not necessarily the best long term option!

Example: A REEFE® RP18000 L /Hr filter and waterfall pump (250 watt) costs approximately $550.00 per year, run continuously. In comparison, a ¾ hp pool pump 15000 L /Hr (550 watt) would cost approximately $1220.00 per year, run continuously. So a short-term saving becomes a long-term liability!

 

TIP ! Have an electrician set up a daylight sensor switch on waterfall pumps so the pump turns off at night – this saves power and money!

7. DIMENSIONS OF PUMPS

We have included the dimensions of all our pond pumps. The sizes are in mm and include the cable exit in the length, and outlet height in the overall height.

8. DRY-MOUNTING POND PUMPS, IN-LINE USE

Pond Pumps are not designed to be self-priming, so when they are installed in a dry mount or in-line situation, they must have “flooded” suction. That is, the pump must be installed below the water level so that the water gravity-feeds into the inlet of the pump. When dry-mounting, it is also necessary to protect the pump from the sun to avoid over-heating, and install a pre filter of some sort to prevent particles entering the suction line and blocking the pump. Not all pond pumps may be dry-mounted, check the tables in this product description , there is a column that is headed, “DRY-MOUNT FLOODED” if this says NO, then you cannot use that pump in a dry-mount situation

9. Note that these guidelines are broad generalizations, and may not suit every application.

Please consult your retail specialist for more information and advice. It is the user’s responsibility to ensure that the product chosen is suitable for the users application. Incorrect use of products voids all warranty.

Sewage, Sump, Drainage, Grinder, Cutter, Effluent Pumps Explained

Learn the difference between Sump Pumps and Drainage Pumps and the various types.

The Difference between Sewage, Sump, Drainage Pumps & More

This page will explain the difference between Sump Pumps, Sewage Pumps, Drainage Pumps, Sewage Grinder Pumps, Sewage Cutter Pumps, Sewage Ejector Pumps & Pump Stations. It will also show you what pumps to use for each situation. This is very helpful when deciding which submersible pump to buy.


SUMP PUMPS

Sump pumps are designed to pump clean or dirty water such as surface or ground water that leak into a building. Sump pumps only have to pump water, but can handle small particles (not large particle sizes).

If there are some solids then a sewage pump can usually do the job of a sump pump.

What separates sump pumps from sewage pumps is their inability to handle solids or larger particle sizes.

A sump pump is normally installed in a pit at the low end of a basement or crawl space floor.

There are many ways that these pumps can be used for draining water.

1 – Water flows from your house via the perimeter drains of a basement waterproofing system, funneling into the basin or because of rain or natural ground water, if the basement is below the water table level.

2 – Basement flooding is another use for a sump pump.

This water flows to the tank or pit. As the tank/pit fills, it causes the float switch to stand up vertically, triggering the pump to turn on and empty the tank until the float switch lays horizontal again (floating on top of the water) which automatically switches the pump off.

A discharge pipe is attached to the outlet of the pump which pushes the drained fluid up and away from the tank/pit. Sump pumps send water away from a house to any place where it is no longer problematic, such as a storm drain or sanity sewer.

You can use sump pumps to drain or pump fluids from many situations. When selecting a pump, you need to look at the particle size that the pump can handle. I have clearly listed the particle size that each model can handle.

The next thing to look at when selecting a pump is the total head that the pump can handle. As the head increases, the flow lessens. The flows in LPM (Liters Per Minute) listed is the maximum flow the pump will deliver at the lowest head.

Calculate the head by adding the static head plus the pipe friction loss and the discharge pressure. I can help you work this out if you email me your pumping situation details.

Another thing to look at is the flow required. Most set ups don’t need a large flow, but if you need to pump out a large amount of water quickly then you need to look at how many Liters Per Minute (LPM) the pump will handle.

We sell Packaged Pump Systems that include the pump, tank and controls, etc. Please contact me for a quote on a Packaged Pump Stations.


SEWAGE PUMPS

Sewage Pumps or Effluent Pumps are designed to pump dirty water and sewage (which has overflowed from septic tank), from the grey water tank / pump-out-pit and not actual RAW SEWAGE.

What separates sewage pumps from ordinary sump pumps / drainage pumps is their ability to handle larger solids.They can usually handle larger particles and solids up to 35mm (sometimes larger) that overflow from the septic tank.

There are many ways that these pumps can be used for draining dirty water. The basic way the pump works on effluent is as follows: Raw sewage and grey water flow from your house downhill to the septic tank. From the septic tank, the fluids overflow into the grey water tank/pump-out-pit. The sewage pump sits at the bottom of this tank/pit. As the tank/pit fills, it causes the float switch to stand up vertically, triggering the pump to turn on and empty the tank until the float switch lays horizontal again (floating on top of the fluid) which automatically switches the pump off.

A discharge pipe is attached to the outlet of the pump which pushes the drained fluid up and away from the tank/pit.

You can use these sewage pumps to drain or pump fluids from many situations. When selecting a pump, you need to look at the particle size that the pump can handle. If you are pumping effluent from a septic tank, then a pump that can handle larger particle sizes would be better. I have clearly listed the particle size that each model can handle.

The next thing to look at when selecting a pump is the total head that the pump can handle. As the head increases, the flow lessens. The flows in LPM (Liters Per Minute) listed is the maximum flow the pump will deliver at the lowest head.

Calculate the head by adding the static head plus the pipe friction loss and the discharge pressure. I can help you work this out if you email me your pumping situation details.

Another thing to look at is the flow required. Most set ups don’t need a large flow, but if you need to pump out a large amount of water quickly then you need to look at how many Liters Per Minute (LPM) the pump will handle.

We sell Packaged Pump Systems that include the pump, tank and controls, etc. Please contact me for a quote on a Packaged Pump System.


 

DRAINAGE PUMPS

Drainage pumps are usually used for draining clean water only, so the particle sizes are smaller than that of a sewage pump or sump pump. You can use drainage pumps to drain or pump fluids from many situations.

There is even a Puddle Sucker Pump that will drain water down to a level of 2mm.

These pumps can be used with an automatic float switch as in the image or manually. If there is not a lot of room in the pit or tank, then they can be used with a controller.

The water flows to the tank or pit. As the tank/pit fills, it causes the float switch to stand up vertically, triggering the pump to turn on and empty the tank until the float switch lays horizontal again (floating on top of the water) which automatically switches the pump off.

A discharge pipe is attached to the outlet of the pump which pushes the drained fluid up and away from the tank/pit. Drainage pumps send water away to any place where it is no longer problematic, such as a storm drain or sanity sewer.

When selecting a pump, you need to look at the particle size that the pump can handle. I have clearly listed the particle size that each model can handle.

The next thing to look at when selecting a pump is the total head that the pump can handle. As the head increases, the flow lessens. The flows in LPM (Liters Per Minute) listed is the maximum flow the pump will deliver at the lowest head.

Calculate the head by adding the static head plus the pipe friction loss and the discharge pressure. I can help you work this out if you email me your pumping situation details.

Another thing to look at is the flow required. Most set ups don’t need a large flow, but if you need to pump out a large amount of water quickly then you need to look at how many Liters Per Minute (LPM) the pump will handle.

We sell Packaged Pump Systems that include the pump, tank and controls, etc. Please contact me for a quote on a Packaged Pump Station. Drainage Pumps


SEWAGE GRINDER PUMP

To pump RAW SEWAGE use a Sewage Grinder Pump. If it is being used for a public venue then it would be best to use a Grinder Pump and not a Cutter Pump.

Waste from water-using household appliances (toilets, bathtubs, washing machines, etc) flows through the home’s pipes into the grinder pump’s holding tank. Once the wastewater inside the tank reaches a certain level, the pump will turn on, grind the waste into a fine slurry, and pump it to the septic tank or sewer system.

Sewage Grinder Pumps can be used with an automatic float switch, with a controller or manually. If there is not a lot of room in the pit or tank, then they are usually used with a controller.

The next thing to look at when selecting a pump is the total head that the pump can handle. As the head increases, the flow lessens. The flows in LPM (Liters Per Minute) listed is the maximum flow the pump will deliver at the lowest head.

Another thing to look at is the flow required. Most set ups don’t need a large flow, but if you need to pump out a large amount of water quickly then you need to look at how many Liters Per Minute (LPM) the pump will handle.

Calculate the head by adding the static head plus the pipe friction loss and the discharge pressure. I can help you work this out if you email me your pumping situation details.

We sell Packaged Pump Systems that include the pump, tank and controls, etc. Please contact me for a quote on a Packaged Pump Station.


SEWAGE CUTTER PUMP

To pump RAW SEWAGE use a Sewage Cutter Pump. A sewage cutter pump is similar to the grinder pump but can’t handle everything that may get flushed down a toilet. It can only handle raw sewage and toilet paper. This is why a cutter pump can be used for a household situation where you know what is going into the tank. But if it is a public venue, a grinder pump is needed.

Waste from water-using household appliances (toilets, bathtubs, washing machines, etc) flows through the home’s pipes into the grinder pump’s holding tank. Once the wastewater inside the tank reaches a certain level, the pump will turn on, grind the waste into a fine slurry, and pump it to the septic tank or sewer system.

These pumps can be used with an automatic float switch, with a controller or manually. If there is not a lot of room in the pit or tank, then they are usually used with a controller.

The next thing to look at when selecting a pump is the total head that the pump can handle. As the head increases, the flow lessens. The flows in LPM (Liters Per Minute) listed is the maximum flow the pump will deliver at the lowest head.

Another thing to look at is the flow required. Most set ups don’t need a large flow, but if you need to pump out a large amount of water quickly then you need to look at how many Liters Per Minute (LPM) the pump will handle.

Calculate the head by adding the static head plus the pipe friction loss and the discharge pressure. I can help you work this out if you email me your pumping situation details.

Cutter Pumps are often used in our Packaged Pump Systems that include the pump, tank and controls, etc. Please contact me for a quote on a Packaged Pump Station. Cutter Pumps


 

SEWAGE EJECTOR PUMP

If you are pumping sewage effluent and grey water from a house to your septic tank and there is not enough fall for the fluids to gravity feed freely into your septic tank, then a small pumping system (which includes a small tank with a sewage pump, usually a grinder pump) may be required to store the fluids under the house and pump them uphill to reach the septic.

These pumps can be automatic (with a float switch or controller) or manual.

Sewage Ejector Pumps are designed to remove sewage from a building where plumbing fixtures and their drains are lower than the building sewer line and/or septic tank.

Most systems need to be custom made as tank sizes and pump sizes will vary depending on how many utilities such as toilets, showers, basins, etc are feeding the tank and what flow is required to empty the tank.

When selecting a pump, you need to look at the total head that the pump can handle. As the head increases, the flow lessens. The flows in LPM (Liters Per Minute) listed is the maximum flow the pump will deliver at the lowest head.

Calculate the head by adding the static head plus the pipe friction loss and the discharge pressure. I can help you work this out if you email me your pumping situation details.

Another thing to look at is the flow required. Most set ups don’t need a large flow, but if you need to pump out a large amount of liquids quickly then you need to look at how many Liters Per Minute (LPM) the pump will handle.

We sell Packaged Pump Systems that include the pump, tank and controls, etc. Please contact me for a quote on a Packaged Pump Station.


 
 

PUMP SYSTEMS – PACKAGED PUMP STATIONS

Complete Packaged Systems – pre-plumbed with Premium Quality REEFE® Submersible Pumps

REEFE® Packaged Pump Stations are available to your specific custom requirements.

Pit Options  

  • POLYETHYLENE PITS (Most Popular)

Heavy Duty pits available in set sizes from 250 litre to 5000 litre polyethylene is a resilient light-weight material which has excellent chemical resistance. It is very easy to plumb connections  

  • FIBREGLASS PITS

Fibreglass stations are a light-weight corrosive resistant option and are available in a variety of sizes from 250 to 8700 Litres, as a standard product. Custom made pits are available and can accommodate any specific design feature. Also available with valve chamber.

 

  • CONCRETE PRE-CAST PITS

Heavy duty concrete pits suitable for large commercial and municipal pump stations.

  Pump Options

  • VORTEX DRAINAGE PUMPS – Available in 240 and 415 volt
  • CUTTER PUMPS – Suitable for domestic sewerage. Available in 240 and 415 volt
  • GRINDER PUMPS – Suitable for public venue sewage pumping applications. Available in 240 and 415 volt
  • SINGLE CHANNEL PUMPS – Heavy duty applications for waste water and sewerage. Available in 415 volt only
  • DRAINAGE PUMPS – Available in 240 and 415 volt

  Control Panels

  • Single & Dual Pump controllers
  • BMS systems
  • DOL Starters
  • Liquid Level Controllers
  • Available for 240 and 415 volt

  Access Covers

  • A full range of covers and grates are also available in Class A, B, C and D. Covers are available in various sizes.

The variety of combinations makes these units suitable for nearly all applications.

Units can be pre-assembled and factory tested with only minor commissioning required. We deliver direct to site and a commissioning service is available if required. Supported by a reliable back-up service.

All systems can be supplied with REEFE® Submersible Pumps, Control Systems, Floats and Guide Rail Systems.

Contact us with your inquiry today!

How to Install a Rain to Mains Changeover Valve to an External Pressure Pump

Install your own rain water to mains water switch over pump.

RM1500 Installation for External Pressure Pumps

Aquasaver installation for external pressure pumps. Water Diversion Valve Installation.

Follow these simple steps on how to install the Aquasaver Water Diversion Valve to an External Household Pressure Pump.

Step 1

The RM1500 Valve is fitted onto the pump controller as shown in Fig. 1.

Tighten the 1″ FBSP loose nut with the fibre washer supplied.

Step 2

Connect mains water to the RM1500 using the 1″ FBSP connection.

Step 3

Connect outlet to the house supply using the 1″ FBSP connection.

NOTE

When using a pump with an automatic restart controller, allow for the outlet on the tank to be higher than the pump inlet.

This allows air to escape when tank is refilling and prevents airlocks.

Connection of the pump should be carried out according to manufacturer’s instructions.

All plumbing connections should be carried out by a licensed plumber, according to local council regulations.

How to Install a Rain to Mains Changeover Valve to a Submersible Pump

If you already have your own pressure pump, install the valve to automatically switch from rainwater to mains water.

RM1500 Installation for Submersible Pumps

Install a Rain to Mains Changeover Valve / Water Diversion Valve to a Submersible Pump.

Step 1

Fill the 1″ pipe with water until full to remove air before connecting the RM1500 valve.

Step 2

The RM1500 Valve is fitted on to a 1″ BSP male union fitted on top of the pipe. Tighten the 1″ FBSP loose nut with the fibre washer supplied.

Step 3

Connect mains water to the RM1500 using the 1″ FBSP connection.

Step 4

Connect outlet to the house supply using the 1″ FBSP connection.

Connection of the pump should be carried out according to manufacturer’s instructions.

All plumbing connections should be carried out by a licensed plumber, according to local council regulations.

If you would like a submersible pressure pump with a built-in pressure controller that can be fitted with the RM1500 device, please look at the RPS036 and the RPS050